Discussants

Rosie JohnsonRosie Johnson

Discussant for Nuha Abdo

Rosie is studying Arabic and Islamic studies and is a first year at Harris Manchester College. For the past two years she has been working all over Europe in refugee camps. She set up a project in Serbia and Italy called SolidariTea and was manager of a safe house for refugee families in Bosnia. She hopes to go on to do more long term and sustainable refugee integration/aid at the end of her degree.

 

 

Past Discussants

JC Niala

Discussant for Winsome PinnockJC Niala pic

JC Niala is an award winning stage and screen writer. Her play Unsettled is due for release by Methuen in January 2019 forms part of a collection of contemporary African women Playwrights. It is the second collection of African Women Playwrights ever to be published. JC is an Honorary Research Fellow at the department of Theatre and Performance Studies, University of Warwick where she is also community manager of the African Women Playwright’s Network. JC Niala is reading for a DPhil in Anthropology at St. Catherine’s College, University of Oxford. Find her on Twitter @jcniala

Tigan Palmer

Discussant for Eileen Myles

Tigan PTigan Palmer grew up in Cornwall with the countryside and the sea. She spent several years in Brighton completing her undergraduate degree at the University of Sussex, worked as a Teacher in Bristol for two years, then completed her Master of Studies degree in English and American Studies at Oxford in 2017. She now lives and works in London, splitting her time working in a pub and for a social inclusion charity for women and girls. Her research interests lay within 20th and 21st century poetry, contemporary American literature, female writing, the quotidian, the lyric, and animal literature. She is a dog person perhaps more than she is anything else.

Annette Zimmermann

Discussant for Heather Widdows

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Annette Zimmermann is a DPhil student at Nuffield College. She is primarily interested in contemporary democratic theory, the ethics of migration, and the ethics of risk. In her thesis, she defends an argument in favour of the democratic enfranchisement of noncitizens. Annette identifies as queer intersectional feminist.

Guo Sheng Liu

Discussant for Jessica Lynn

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Guo Sheng Liu (“Guosh”) grew up in Singapore and is currently a student of Spanish and Portuguese at Lincoln College as well as a co-chair of OUSU LGBTQ+ Campaign. They have been involved in LGBTQ+ activism in other ways through being LGBTQ+ Rep in their college and BME Rep in the LGBTQ+ Society. They strongly believe in recognising the intersection of different kinds of oppression and are particularly interested in trans activism and anti-racism. In their free time, they enjoy learning more languages and tending to their virtual garden.

Zuzanna Olszewska

Discussant for Fatemeh Shams

Zuzanna Olszewska is Associate Professor in the Social Anthropology of the Middle East at the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford, and a fellow of St. John’s College. She specialises in the ethnography of Iran and Afghanistan, with a focus on Afghan refugees in Iran, the Persian-speaking Afghan diaspora, and the anthropology of literature and digital cultural production. She is the author of The Pearl of Dari: Poetry and Personhood among Young Afghans in Iran (Indiana University Press, 2015), an ethnographic inquiry into how poetic activity reflects changes in youth subjectivity in an Afghan refugee community, based on fieldwork with an Afghan cultural organisation in Mashhad, Iran.

Hamsa Rajan

Discussant for Pragna Patel

Hamsa Rajan has recently completed her PhD at Oxford in the Department of Social Policy and Intervention.  She researches domestic violence in the Tibetan communities of Qinghai province, China.  Her work investigates household gender dynamics; individual, community, and official responses to abuse; and the question of how and whether theories arising primarily from Western country contexts can be relevant to the experience of family abuse in Tibetan regions and other non-Western settings. In the past, she worked on gender awareness trainings for the World Health Organization, as a gender-based violence consultant, on public health projects in rural Tibetan villages, as a document and documentary translator for a Chinese NGO aiding orphans, and as a fundraiser for poverty alleviation in impoverished Tibetan communities.  She has also volunteered in domestic violence services, and has acted as a guest lecturer teaching Gender Studies to Tibetan university students.

Karen McCallum

Discussant for Lisa Monchalin

Karen McCallum is a PhD candidate in Human Rights at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, School of Advanced Study (University of London). She has a research background in interdisciplinary social sciences with an expertise in Gender Studies and Feminist Research (MA, McMaster University) and Environmental Studies (BENV, University of Waterloo). Her PhD project aims to strengthen and support cross-cultural activist alliances between settler and Indigenous environmental organisers in Canada.

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